ARTIST RESIDENCIES
Seoul Institute of the Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Maryland Institute College of Art
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THE IMAGINARY APP
A new book about Apps and the way they have changed everything! Featuring essays and articles by writers, artists, and theoreticians.

Anthology Edited By Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky and Svitlana Matviyenko. OUT SOON!


DJ Spooky Secret Song iPhone App
DJ SPOOKY iPhone App
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DJ Spooky Merch!
DJ Spooky has participated in two new book projects.

One is Green Patriot Posters. DJ Spooky's Manifesto for a People's Republic of Antarctica graphic design prints are included along with several of his friends like Shep Fairey and others. Make your own poster manifesto for a better world!!
greenpatriotposters.org Edited by Edward Morris and Dmitri Siegel
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DJ Spooky also has participated in renowned photographer Lyle Owerko's new book "The Boombox Project" on the history of boomboxes.

// Read the NYT Article
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Copyright Criminals Copyright Criminals - a Documentary by Ben Frantzen and Kembrew Mcleod
I'm in this movie, and I think that they did an excellent job. They have many friends and peers of mine - Jeff Chang, Chuck D (who appeared on my album "Drums of Death"), Clyde Stubblefiend, the drummer for James Brown, and many others. I HIGHLY recommend this film for anyone who is interested in digital culture.!



    Rebirth of a NationORDER NOW!!!
DJ Spooky’s REBIRTH OF A NATION DVD
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Sound UnboundOUT NOW! DJ Spooky's "Sound Unbound"
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Creation Rebel on iTunesCREATION REBEL MIX CD on Trojan Records
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Yoko OnoDJ Spooky has produced material on the new Yoko Ono album.
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Origin Magazine
Rhythm Science RHYTHM SCIENCE:
Book with CD on MIT Press //website
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ARTICLE//


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Terry Riley: In C
by Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky

It’s been 100 years since Filippo Marinetti wrote his infamous “Manifesto of Futurism” and even more since Ferruccio Busoni made his essay “Sketch of a New Aesthetic of Music.” What has changed in the world since these two seminal essays were written? For one thing – we’ve finally come to terms with seeking some kind of balance between noise, rhythm, and repetition. We’ve opened our ears to the sound of the world around us in a way that composers and artists of the last century would have found extremely difficult to come to terms with. Think of the Italian Futurist, Luigi Russolo’s 1915 manifesto “The Art of Noises” and extract: “let us cross a great modern capital with our ears more alert than our eyes and we will delight in distinguishing the eddying of water, air and gas in metal pipes, the muttering of motors that breathe and pulse with an indisputable animality, the throbbing of valves, the bustle of pistons, the shrieks of mechanical saws, the jolting of trams on the tracks, the cracking of whips, the flapping of awnings and flags. We will amuse ourselves by orchestrating together in our imagination the din of rolling shop shutters, slamming doors, the varied hubbub of train stations, iron works, thread mills, printing presses, electrical plants and subways.”

Pretty heady stuff!

What I wanted to explore when The Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble asked me to remix the legendary song “In C” (1964), was a dynamic equilibrium between repetition and some of the “minimalist” issues that we’ve inherited from composers in the 20th century. For me, in the hip-hop era, we need to look back at some precedents in the “avant garde” – George Antheil’s “Ballet Mécanique,” Erik Satie’s music of modal repetition, the serialist movements of Arthur Shoenberg, Anton Webern, and Pierre Boulez, the electronic tape manipulations of the Arab composer Halim El Dabh, the studied, delicate balance between Eastern and Western tonal structures of Debussy’s “La Mer,” the density of India’s traditions of formal compositions in Ravi Shankar, the paradoxical innovations of Olivier Messiaen and Edgard Varèse … all of these find a home in Terry Riley’s riveting and beautiful work. If the original piece is made of 53 short, numbered musical phrases that rotate in and out of overlapping motifs, the remix has distilled some the beauty of the repetition into a rhythm form that many listeners ears grounded in hip hop, techno, dubstep, etc will find familiar terrain. It’s a piece that’s meant to fit into several contexts. When you hear the opening lines of The Who’s “Baba O’Riley” – you know they heard Riley’s work. When you think of Philip Glass, John Adams, Steve Reich, Pauline Oliveros, Meredith Monk, Harry Partch, Morton Feldman, Lou Harrison and others, you can also connect the dots. In C was the original DNA of many of these composers relationship to repetition. I hope that the listener can hear a mirror reflection in a hip hop take on the same composition. The Futurists always thought the future would be noise. Who would have guessed that their ideas would be usurped by repetition! I hope you enjoy the work.

Paul D. Miller aka Dj Spooky, Noosa, north-east Australia, 2009